© All rights reserved Country Tile and Carpet Inc. 2014, 2015

Tile

Ceramic and Porcelain:

Ceramic tile is a mixture of clays and minerals that has been shaped, pressed, then fired at temperatures exceeding 2,000 degrees (F), resulting in a hard surface. The glaze applied to it before firing gives the ceramic tile added color and finish and makes it resistant to stains, odors, bacteria and scratches. Ceramic tiles are suitable for use on walls in bathrooms, or kitchen backsplashes, or light residential floor areas, they can be used on countertops only the durability will not be the same as a porcelain tile. Porcelain tile is a type of ceramic made of a very fine mixture of clays and minerals similar to those found in fine dinnerware. These special clays allow porcelain tile to be fired at even higher temperatures, exceeding 2,400 degrees (F). The higher temperature results in a very dense tile. The more dense the tile, the better it will resist moisture. Porcelain will offer the most durability; even some considered frost-resistant that can be suitable for outdoor applications. Porcelain is considered the standard for light to heavy commercial, and is more resilient than nearly any other flooring in a residential setting.

Granite:

Granite is an igneous rock that starts as liquid magma deep in the earth. The extreme pressure in the center of the earth compresses the liquid magma, creating a dense material with minimal pores. The density of granite makes it nearly impenetrable. Granite emerges after eons of natural erosion has removed the overlaying layers of older rock. Granite is a speckled stone that has a range of colors between Absolute Black to Salt and Pepper White. The variation in color is a result or the minerals in granite which are sometimes found in ceramic and porcelain; feldspar, quartz and mica. When purchasing granite you should expect to get variation. In any natural stone, every square inch looks different, there is absolutely no control in the making of it. Any natural irregularities should be looked at as almost a natural kaleidoscope, and not seen as a defect.

Marble:

Marble is a metamorphic limestone, which begins as a sedimentary stone consisting of seashells and the bones of sea creatures that have settled to the ocean floor. Calcium in the sediment combines with carbon dioxide in water to form calcium carbonate. High heat and pressure cause the fossilized materials along with its original carbonate minerals, to crystallize and transform limestone into marble. Marble can be compared to fingerprints, no two pieces will ever look the same. As the stone is being formed, fissures are filled with various minerals causing the veining and color to vary from stone to stone, this is the appeal of marble.

Limestone:

Limestone is typically formed over many years at the bottom of oceans or lakes from the accumulation of shells, bones, and other calcium rich goods. If this limestone is subjected to intense heat or pressure and a few millenniums, crystallization will occur and the limestone will become a "true marble". It is softer and for this reason, it will usually be tumbled or honed, not brought up to a full polish. The variation will change from piece to piece, but does not carry the same color spectrum as granite or marble.

Slate:

Slate is a fine-grained rock that can easily be split into thin, durable sheets. It consists mainly of grains of mica and quartz, plus smaller amounts of chlorite, hematite, and other materials. Slate is a metamorphic rock. Most slate is formed below earth's surface by changes in the makeup and appearance of shale, a sedimentary rock. Heat from deep in the earth changes some of the clay in shale into mica and chlorite. Slate results when pressure created by mountain-forming movements in the earth's crust squeezes the mica and other minerals into parallel layers. The colors of slate can be very dramatic and extreme. As an example, Indian Multicolor ranges from purple to gray to red to green. It creates a beautiful look, but consistency should not be expected.

Travertine:

Travertine is a sedimentary calciferous stone formed in hot springs. Typically, hot water passes through limestone beds and takes the calcium, from the limestone into suspension and takes that solution to the surface where the water evaporates and leaves the calcium crystals in layers on the surface. Travertine can be filled, usually with a cementicous filler, or left unfilled for a more rustic appearance. Travertine comes in several shades of crème/beige, brown, pink, and gold, and is available in a number of different tile sizes. Depending on the shade chosen, the variation will differ. Shades such as beige will usually be more consistent, if you go with a shade like Giallo or Macchiato the variation will be more distinct.

Maintenance Tips:

To maintain Natural Stone you must start at the installation. Use a deep penetrating sealer to prevent staining. Clean it with a dust mop and "neutral base", "special stone", or "pH balanced" cleaner. Do not use an acidic cleaner, including (but not limited to) vinegar or anything with "lemon" or "lime" on the label. These will grind down the polish from the stone. The sealer will not protect the stone from these types of cleaners.
Install tile anywhere in your home for a fair, affordable price.
847-639-0432
Country Tile & Carpet, Inc. 3300 Three Oaks Rd. Cary, Illinois 60013
© All rights reserved Country Tile and Carpet Inc. 2014, 2015

Maintenance Tips:

To maintain Natural Stone you must start at the installation. Use a deep penetrating sealer to prevent staining. Clean it with a dust mop and "neutral base", "special stone", or "pH balanced" cleaner. Do not use an acidic cleaner, including (but not limited to) vinegar or anything with "lemon" or "lime" on the label. These will grind down the polish from the stone. The sealer will not protect the stone from these types of cleaners.
Install tile anywhere in your home for a fair, affordable price.

Tile

Ceramic and Porcelain:

Ceramic tile is a mixture of clays and minerals that has been shaped, pressed, then fired at temperatures exceeding 2,000 degrees (F), resulting in a hard surface. The glaze applied to it before firing gives the ceramic tile added color and finish and makes it resistant to stains, odors, bacteria and scratches. Ceramic tiles are suitable for use on walls in bathrooms, or kitchen backsplashes, or light residential floor areas, they can be used on countertops only the durability will not be the same as a porcelain tile. Porcelain tile is a type of ceramic made of a very fine mixture of clays and minerals similar to those found in fine dinnerware. These special clays allow porcelain tile to be fired at even higher temperatures, exceeding 2,400 degrees (F). The higher temperature results in a very dense tile. The more dense the tile, the better it will resist moisture. Porcelain will offer the most durability; even some considered frost-resistant that can be suitable for outdoor applications. Porcelain is considered the standard for light to heavy commercial, and is more resilient than nearly any other flooring in a residential setting.

Granite:

Granite is an igneous rock that starts as liquid magma deep in the earth. The extreme pressure in the center of the earth compresses the liquid magma, creating a dense material with minimal pores. The density of granite makes it nearly impenetrable. Granite emerges after eons of natural erosion has removed the overlaying layers of older rock. Granite is a speckled stone that has a range of colors between Absolute Black to Salt and Pepper White. The variation in color is a result or the minerals in granite which are sometimes found in ceramic and porcelain; feldspar, quartz and mica. When purchasing granite you should expect to get variation. In any natural stone, every square inch looks different, there is absolutely no control in the making of it. Any natural irregularities should be looked at as almost a natural kaleidoscope, and not seen as a defect.

Marble:

Marble is a metamorphic limestone, which begins as a sedimentary stone consisting of seashells and the bones of sea creatures that have settled to the ocean floor. Calcium in the sediment combines with carbon dioxide in water to form calcium carbonate. High heat and pressure cause the fossilized materials along with its original carbonate minerals, to crystallize and transform limestone into marble. Marble can be compared to fingerprints, no two pieces will ever look the same. As the stone is being formed, fissures are filled with various minerals causing the veining and color to vary from stone to stone, this is the appeal of marble.

Limestone:

Limestone is typically formed over many years at the bottom of oceans or lakes from the accumulation of shells, bones, and other calcium rich goods. If this limestone is subjected to intense heat or pressure and a few millenniums, crystallization will occur and the limestone will become a "true marble". It is softer and for this reason, it will usually be tumbled or honed, not brought up to a full polish. The variation will change from piece to piece, but does not carry the same color spectrum as granite or marble.

Slate:

Slate is a fine-grained rock that can easily be split into thin, durable sheets. It consists mainly of grains of mica and quartz, plus smaller amounts of chlorite, hematite, and other materials. Slate is a metamorphic rock. Most slate is formed below earth's surface by changes in the makeup and appearance of shale, a sedimentary rock. Heat from deep in the earth changes some of the clay in shale into mica and chlorite. Slate results when pressure created by mountain-forming movements in the earth's crust squeezes the mica and other minerals into parallel layers. The colors of slate can be very dramatic and extreme. As an example, Indian Multicolor ranges from purple to gray to red to green. It creates a beautiful look, but consistency should not be expected.

Travertine:

Travertine is a sedimentary calciferous stone formed in hot springs. Typically, hot water passes through limestone beds and takes the calcium, from the limestone into suspension and takes that solution to the surface where the water evaporates and leaves the calcium crystals in layers on the surface. Travertine can be filled, usually with a cementicous filler, or left unfilled for a more rustic appearance. Travertine comes in several shades of crème/beige, brown, pink, and gold, and is available in a number of different tile sizes. Depending on the shade chosen, the variation will differ. Shades such as beige will usually be more consistent, if you go with a shade like Giallo or Macchiato the variation will be more distinct.
847-639-0432
Country Tile & Carpet, Inc. 3300 Three Oaks Rd. Cary, Illinois 60013